Raj2796's Blog

September 30, 2011

Novell Application Launcher (NAL) – diagnosing freezing, slow starting and other problems.

Filed under: edir,Netware — raj2796 @ 2:58 pm

This post is a collated note to myself of useful links and information from goggling these issues when I encountered them in the past.  We encountered an issue in the recent past where nal failed to load at random.

Whilst it turned out to be edir corruption of our user container its reoccurred, my moneys on corruption again!

You can however, investigate in detail by enabling nal debugging and tracing what happens. With debugging enabled to the level you need logs will be generated which should hopefully give you a clue what’s wrong. You have two options

  •  manually hack in the relevant reg settings
Enabling Debug Logging for the Novell Application Launcher
Debug logging for the Novell® Application LauncherTM is enabled in the Windows registry or using the diagnostic tool, naldiag.exe. This section focuses on using the registry to enable debug logging.
NOTE:  The keys in this table are the same as those that are set by nialdiag.exe.
The table below specifies the information you need to edit registry of the workstation where the Application Launcher agent is running:
Registry Key and Hive Location Value Name Value Type Data Notes
HKLM\Software\NetWare\NAL\1.0\Debug Level DWORD 0 (Off) Location: program files\novell\zenworks\
zfdnal.csv (default location if none is specified)
1 (Informational messages only)
2 (Warning messages only)
3 (Informational and Warning messages only)
4 (Critical messages only)
5 (Informational and Critical messages only)
6 (Warning and Critical messages only)
F (All messages)
HKLM\Software\NetWare\NAL\1.0\Debug LogFileLocation STRING location_and_filename_of_output_file Location: program files\novell\zenworks\
zfdnal.csv (default location if none is specified)
HKLM\Software\NetWare\NAL\1.0\Debug Browser DWORD 0 (Off) Destination: Browser log file as specified
1 (On) Location: program files\novell\zenworks\
zfdnal.csv (default location if none is specified)
HKLM\Software\NetWare\NAL\1.0\Debug Explorer DWORD 0 (Off) Destination: Application Explorer log file as specified
1 (On) Location: program files\novell\zenworks\
zfdnal.csv (default location if none is specified)
HKLM\Software\NetWare\NAL\1.0\Debug IPC DWORD 0 (Off) Destination: IPC log file as specified
1 (On) Location: program files\novell\zenworks\
zfdnal.csv (default location if none is specified)
HKLM\Software\NetWare\NAL\1.0\Debug Library DWORD 0 (Off) Destination: Library log file specified

 

1 (On) Location: program files\novell\zenworks\
zfdnal.csv (default location if none is specified)
HKLM\Software\NetWare\NAL\1.0\Debug MUP DWORD 0 (Off) Destination: MUP log file as specified
1 (On) Location: program files\novell\zenworks\
zfdnal.csv (default location if none is specified)
HKLM\Software\NetWare\NAL\1.0\Debug Reporting DWORD 0 (Off) Destination: Reporting log file as specified
1 (On) Location: program files\novell\zenworks\
zfdnal.csv (default location if none is specified)
HKLM\Software\NetWare\NAL\1.0\Debug Service DWORD 0 (Off) Destination: NT Services log file as specified
1 (On) Location: program files\novell\zenworks\
zfdnal.csv (default location if none is specified)
HKLM\Software\NetWare\NAL\1.0\Debug Start DWORD 0 (Off) Destination: Startup log file as specified
1 (On) Location: program files\novell\zenworks\
zfdnal.csv (default location if none is specified)
HKLM\Software\NetWare\NAL\1.0\Debug Workstation DWORD 0 (Off) Destination: Workstation log file as specified
1 (On) Location: program files\novell\zenworks\
zfdnal.csv (default location if none is specified)
HKLM\Software\NetWare\NAL\1.0\Debug MSI DWORD 0 (Off) Location: program files\novell\zenworks\
zappmsi.log
1 (On) Alternatively, zappmsi.log is in the path listed in the LogFileLocation string value, if specified
  • OR use the naldiag.exe tool,  it will create the registry keys for logging for you, You should fine it located under

c:\Program Files\Novell\ZENworks\NalDiag.exe

USEFUL LINKS

a.k.a where I got the information from

The importance of launcher configuration

Enable debug logging in ZDM

Slow Nal start-up or refresh

September 28, 2011

Windows Symbolic links, Hard links, Junctions and problem accessing remotely

Filed under: MS — raj2796 @ 11:03 am

Microsoft has once again implemented more features from rival os’s, which can only be a good thing since in this case it’s Linux. Symbolic links, hard links and junctions can now be created in windows via the mklink command, older OS’s e.g. XP need to download the resource pack and grab linkd

USAGE

Mklink – vista/windows 7/ windows 2008 / windows 8

There are 3 options for mklink

  • Symbolic links – selected via the /D flag – these are like short cuts – a symbolic link to a directory is created, the default is a file symbolic link . For those of us from Linux think softlink
  • Hard link – selected via the /H flag – only for files – if you delete the hard link you delete the actual file as opposed to symbolic links where you just delete the link to the file
  • Junction – selected via the /J flag – created a directory junction i.e. hard link to a directory
For example, if you want to create a symbolic link from your appv content directory e.g. c:\AppV\content to a dev directory e.g. c:\AppV\dev you would type:
mklink /D c:\Appv\content\dev c:\Appv\dev
as shown in the below image
Linkd - only on older machines such as XP, mklink is far better

LINKD Link [/D] Target

REMOTE ACCESS TO LINKS

I suggest using a junction, they work remotely by default, however if you need to access a symbolic link remotely you can by editing the symbolic link evaluation. MS explain this on technet here – the relevant part being:

Evaluations. A user can enable or disable any of the four evaluations that are available in symbolic links. The available evaluations are:

  • Local-to-local describes a computer accessing a local symbolic link that points to a local file or folder.
  • Local-to-remote is a computer accessing a local symbolic link that points to a Universal Naming Convention (UNC) path using the server message block (SMB) protocol.
  • Remote-to-local is a computer accessing a remote symbolic link that points to a local file or folder using SMB.
  • Remote-to-remote describes a computer accessing a remote symbolic link that points to a remote UNC path using SMB.
to allow all use the command :
fsutil behavior set SymlinkEvaluation L2L:1 R2R:1 L2R:1 R2L:1
e.g:

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